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Dr. Dahlia Jackson-O’Brien is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources and State Small Ruminant Specialist for Cooperative Extension at Delaware State University.

  Dahlia Jackson-O'Brien, PhD


Dahlia Jackson-O'Brien, PhD

Assistant Professor and Small Ruminant Specialist
Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources
College of Agriculture & Related Sciences
Delaware State University
1200 N. DuPont Hwy
Dover, Delaware 19901
302-857-6490
djjackson@desu.edu
 


 
Dr. Dahlia Jackson-O’Brien is an Assistant Professor and Small Ruminant Specialist in the Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Delaware State University. Dr. O'Brien received her PhD from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in December of 2005. Prior to her position at Delaware State University, Dr. O'Brien served as the Acting Director of the Coastal Ecology Teaching and Research Center in Berlin, MD. As a graduate student, Dr. O'Brien was involved with projects examining the influence of melengestrol acetate or temporary kid removal in inducing breeding during the late non-breeding or postpartum period in goats; the correlation of milk and blood leptin in does and growth of their offspring; the use of poultry litter as a nitrogen source in small ruminants; anthelmintic resistance in a Maryland small ruminant flock; and the influence of breed and nutrition on growth, parasite resistance, carcass traits and meat quality of crossbred Katahdin lambs. Dr. O'Brien's current research interest include characterizing levels of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants in the Mid-Atlantic U.S., evaluating the efficacy of natural/alternative dewormers and genetics in parasite control, evaluating the use of goats as a biological control for invasive weeds, and identifying methods to increase sheep and goat production to satisfy increasing market demands (synchronization and timed-artificial insemination).

 


Research
 
Research Interests:

My current research interests include characterizing levels of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants in the Mid-Atlantic U.S., evaluating the efficacy of natural/alternative dewormers and genetics in parasite control, evaluating the use of goats as a biological control for invasive weeds, and identifying methods to increase sheep and goat production to satisfy increasing market demands (synchronization and timed-artificial insemination).

 

Graduate Students' Research

Elizabeth Crook (2008 - 2010; currently at Virginia Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine)

Study:

Characterization of Anthelmintic Resistance in Small Ruminant (USDA Capacity Building Grant)

Graduate students Jenna Warren and Kwame Matthews conducting fecal egg counts in laboratory.

 Jenna Warren (2009 - present)

Study:

Use of goats to control roadside invasive weeds in Delaware
 

Kwame Matthews (2010 - present)

Study:

Natural dewormers and genetics in controlling internal parasites in small ruminants
 
 
Undergraduate Summer Research
 
  • Characterization of Anthelmintic Resistance in Small Ruminant Gastrointestinal Nematodes (GIN) in the Mid-Atlantic States
  • Out of Season Breeding
  • Garlic as a natural plant dewormer in goats (NESARE project)
  • Anthelmintic Resistance in a Small Goat Herd in Delaware
  • Progesterone Measurement to Determine Estrus Activity in Does at Hickory Hill
  • Comparison of the Efficiency of Two- and Three- Chambered Slides on Determining Fecal Egg Counts in Goats
  • Mating behavior of bucks during the non-breeding season after estrus synchronization protocols in meat does
  • An Observation of the Internal Parasitic Variations Found Using the Modified McMaster Technique, in Relation to Domesticated Goat Kids
 
Research Position:

There are no research positions available at the moment.